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Star Trek: Strange New Worlds’ emotionally unstable Spock is a chilling delight

Star Trek: Strange New Worlds’ emotionally unstable Spock is a chilling delight

M’benga ends up diagnosing Spock with a kind of unchecked humanity, telling him that when he raged fighting the Gorn last season, he accidentally removed the “cognitive blocks” that Vulcans use to control their emotions. . “Now all your emotions are flowing more freely,” he told Spock, concluding, “You’ll just have to learn to live with them, like we all do.” His prescription is just as delightful as his diagnosis: M’benga gives Spock a funky string instrument (actually a Vulcan lute called Ka’athira) and tells him to channel his emotions into music. Side note: Everyone, let’s take a minute here to pray to the stupid TV gods that this means we’ll end up getting a moody Spock ballad performance, a la Giles singing “Behind Blue Eyes” on “Buffy the Vampire Slayer”. Do? Alright, let’s continue.

Spock’s human emotions don’t show much throughout the episode until its end when he thinks his best friend (and possibly crush) Nurse Chapel (Jess Bush) is dead. We already know there’s something brewing between the two because he had his heart monitor on when she walked in earlier, and it skyrocketed in his sight. Perhaps this contributes to his emotional reaction when Chapel is in grave danger. “You don’t die. You don’t die! he said giving her chest compressions. Right now, as Spock cries, he looks like a little boy. Yes, the character is already the most beloved in all of Trek history, so it’s easy to watch him show his human side and get emotional with him, but Peck’s great performance here also plays a big role.

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